This is Ratshag's tumblr. It serves no real purpose.

 

akupitiyo:

nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:

reclusivewanker:

m-ignon:

dreamboatsandtrenchcoats:

Instead of saying motherfucker you can just say Oedipus

Half of our generation wouldn’t even understand that

yes you are right the thousands of notes on this post prove how ignorant our generation is. only you are intelligent. you are the chosen one.

only real Ancient Greek kids would understand

reblog if ur a tru 650BC kid

raisehelia:

pinstripehourglass:

shadows of a lost empire

i am ozymandias
king of kings
look upon my works, ye mighty
and get some hair product

(Source: 90s90s90s)

postcardsfromspace:

camharr:

jessicalprice:

The brilliant camharr and I were having a conversation about Lois McMaster Bujold’s work, and she said something so resonant and on-point I had to share it (hopefully she’ll find time to blog her own thoughts about it at some point). In an interview, Bujold makes a great point about how non-universal Campbell’s “Hero’s Journey” actually is (Campbell apparently knew squat about women’s lives and made the typical male academic mistake of assuming that men’s experience is human experience full stop; we’ll leave aside for now all the other reasons the monomyth is crap). In the hero’s journey, the hero goes out into the world, does some stuff, and comes back home. But Bujold points out that given the exogamous nature of most cultures, the heroine goes out into the world, and keeps going. 
And then Cameron gave the most succinct and lovely summation of a heroine’s journey archetype I’ve heard yet:
“Woman loses everything she thinks she needs, discovers her own power, and builds a family who will fight with her to the bitter end.”
Reminds me of a great article I read once about Buffy (and yes, Buffy had its problems, and yes, there are a lot of issues with Joss Whedon’s takes on female heroes, BUT). It pointed out the whole archetype of the hero as lone gunslinger, who protects the community but cannot be part of it, and who must ultimately go it alone to retain his heroic status, and described how Buffy subverts this. Spike articulates it when he notes that Buffy is different — stronger and more resilient — than other Slayers because she has a team around her, and it’s when she tries to go it alone that she (and, I think, the show) falls short. Buffy ultimately embodies a different sort of heroic archetype, one that certainly isn’t exclusively feminine, but I think speaks to more women’s experiences:
The hero is someone who builds and is the center of the heroic family. 
The family may be blood relatives, it may be teammates or coworkers, it may be a group of friends or a biker gang. But it’s a collection of people that together function in the hero role. 
Art by Howard David Johnson.

Here is the interview Jessica refers to. Spoilers only start in the Q&A portion, halfway down the page.
And I would like to write about the heroine’s journey at some point. Just muddling through my thoughts (and other commitments!) first.

Yes. So much, yes.

postcardsfromspace:

camharr:

jessicalprice:

The brilliant camharr and I were having a conversation about Lois McMaster Bujold’s work, and she said something so resonant and on-point I had to share it (hopefully she’ll find time to blog her own thoughts about it at some point). In an interview, Bujold makes a great point about how non-universal Campbell’s “Hero’s Journey” actually is (Campbell apparently knew squat about women’s lives and made the typical male academic mistake of assuming that men’s experience is human experience full stop; we’ll leave aside for now all the other reasons the monomyth is crap). In the hero’s journey, the hero goes out into the world, does some stuff, and comes back home. But Bujold points out that given the exogamous nature of most cultures, the heroine goes out into the world, and keeps going. 

And then Cameron gave the most succinct and lovely summation of a heroine’s journey archetype I’ve heard yet:

Woman loses everything she thinks she needs, discovers her own power, and builds a family who will fight with her to the bitter end.”

Reminds me of a great article I read once about Buffy (and yes, Buffy had its problems, and yes, there are a lot of issues with Joss Whedon’s takes on female heroes, BUT). It pointed out the whole archetype of the hero as lone gunslinger, who protects the community but cannot be part of it, and who must ultimately go it alone to retain his heroic status, and described how Buffy subverts this. Spike articulates it when he notes that Buffy is different — stronger and more resilient — than other Slayers because she has a team around her, and it’s when she tries to go it alone that she (and, I think, the show) falls short. Buffy ultimately embodies a different sort of heroic archetype, one that certainly isn’t exclusively feminine, but I think speaks to more women’s experiences:

The hero is someone who builds and is the center of the heroic family. 

The family may be blood relatives, it may be teammates or coworkers, it may be a group of friends or a biker gang. But it’s a collection of people that together function in the hero role. 

Art by Howard David Johnson.

Here is the interview Jessica refers to. Spoilers only start in the Q&A portion, halfway down the page.

And I would like to write about the heroine’s journey at some point. Just muddling through my thoughts (and other commitments!) first.

Yes. So much, yes.

lospaziobianco:

1) The Little Mermaid pencil test by Glen Keane   via diehard-disney

2) Tangled pencil test by Glen Keane   via diehard-disney

3) Aladdin pencil test   via diehard-disney

4) Sleeping Beauty pencil test by Marc Davis   via diehard-disney

5) 101 Dalmatians pencil test   via diehard-disney

6) Xeroxes of Frank Thomas pencil animation for Pinocchio

(Via: Michael Sporn & The Illusion of Life: Disney Animation)  via the-disney-elite

7) Peter Pan pencil test by Milt Kahl   via diehard-disney

8) The Jungle Book pencil test   via diehard-disney

9) The Rescuers pencil test by Ollie Johnston   via diehard-disney

10) Alice in Wonderland pencil test by Milt Kahl   via diehard-disney

narciii:

baital:

ehbfrh:

sherlocksmyth:

shitshilarious:

queerqueerspawn:

james-tiqueerius:

queerqueerspawn:

glampersand:

glowcloud:

kittiesinqueerland:

robalyn:

the highlighted area is where Jason Derulo knows what the girls want. london to taiwan.

new york to haiti

greenland is right out

ummm no offense but new york to haiti should be measured as the area between the two latitudes, not the longitudes. this graph is incorrect and vastly underestimates the total region of the earth in which Jason Derulo knows what the girls want

Even measuring that way, Greenland remains right out, as does the entirity of Brazil.

Have we considered measuring by neither latitude nor longitude but in all area that would extend perpendicular from the diagonal of the two places?There are many different interpretations of the data, and until more is available, we ought not conclude anything at this point.

In light of that, I posit this alternative map of regions where Jason Derulo is potentially claiming where he knows what girls want:

As we can see, if we assume that model, the vast majority of the area where Jason Derulo knows what girls want is either open ocean (the Atlantic, the Mediterranean Sea) or sparsely populated (the northern Sahara, the northern Arabian Desert, various desert portions of Iran and Afghanistan, and the southern Tibetan Plateau). Four of the ten most populated countries on the planet have no territory in it (Nigeria, Brazil, Japan, and Indonesia), and two which do have relatively little territory in it (the US and Russia). It is suggested that for all his boasting, Jason Derulo does not know what a probable majority of the world’s girls want.

Perhaps Jason Derulo’s intention was never to proclaim to be omnipotent to the interests of the female gender. Perhaps he was instead expressing his humanity, or the limits of his knowledge. I applaud Jason Derulo. Jason Derulo is not just another 2 dimensional character. Jason Derulo has depth.Jason Derulo has limitations and has come to terms with them. Jason Derulo knows Jason Derulo. Thats why he makes it a point to say his name so much.

what drug did you all take because i want in

Math, it’s a hell of a drug.

As a mildly-abashed fan of that song, I applaud this post.

Or possibly Jason Derulo is an absolute God amongst Atlantic Mermaids. 

narciii:

baital:

ehbfrh:

sherlocksmyth:

shitshilarious:

queerqueerspawn:

james-tiqueerius:

queerqueerspawn:

glampersand:

glowcloud:

kittiesinqueerland:

robalyn:

the highlighted area is where Jason Derulo knows what the girls want. london to taiwan.

new york to haiti

greenland is right out

ummm no offense but new york to haiti should be measured as the area between the two latitudes, not the longitudes. this graph is incorrect and vastly underestimates the total region of the earth in which Jason Derulo knows what the girls want

Even measuring that way, Greenland remains right out, as does the entirity of Brazil.

Have we considered measuring by neither latitude nor longitude but in all area that would extend perpendicular from the diagonal of the two places?

There are many different interpretations of the data, and until more is available, we ought not conclude anything at this point.

In light of that, I posit this alternative map of regions where Jason Derulo is potentially claiming where he knows what girls want:

As we can see, if we assume that model, the vast majority of the area where Jason Derulo knows what girls want is either open ocean (the Atlantic, the Mediterranean Sea) or sparsely populated (the northern Sahara, the northern Arabian Desert, various desert portions of Iran and Afghanistan, and the southern Tibetan Plateau). Four of the ten most populated countries on the planet have no territory in it (Nigeria, Brazil, Japan, and Indonesia), and two which do have relatively little territory in it (the US and Russia). It is suggested that for all his boasting, Jason Derulo does not know what a probable majority of the world’s girls want.

Perhaps Jason Derulo’s intention was never to proclaim to be omnipotent to the interests of the female gender. Perhaps he was instead expressing his humanity, or the limits of his knowledge. I applaud Jason Derulo. Jason Derulo is not just another 2 dimensional character. Jason Derulo has depth.Jason Derulo has limitations and has come to terms with them. Jason Derulo knows Jason Derulo. Thats why he makes it a point to say his name so much.

what drug did you all take because i want in

Math, it’s a hell of a drug.

As a mildly-abashed fan of that song, I applaud this post.

Or possibly Jason Derulo is an absolute God amongst Atlantic Mermaids.